Pasar al contenido principal

Recibir cosas gratis es genial…hasta que dejan de ser gratis. Pero lo que no es en absoluto genial es cuando después de seducirte con “pruebas gratis” de productos que te podrían gustar, una compañía te da el palo con cargos sorpresa durante el período de prueba supuestamente “gratis”.

En una demanda presentada ante una corte federal, la FTC alega que NutraClick, que comercializaba suplementos dietarios y productos de belleza a través de programas de suscripción, infringió la ley al no aclarar exactamente cuándo terminaban sus pruebas gratis y cuándo comenzaba la facturación. NutraClick ofreció muestras de sus productos como parte de un período de prueba gratis de 18 o 34 días para conseguir que la gente se inscribiera en sus programas de suscripción. Pero los períodos de prueba incluían términos de opción negativa que establecían que los vendedores podían efectuar cargos automáticamente a las tarjetas o cuentas bancarias de la gente si no cancelaban sus suscripciones.

Según la FTC, NutraClick infringió las reglas de telemercadeo y las leyes de ventas en línea e ignoró una orden de una corte federal al no decirle debidamente a la gente que, para evitar los cargos de la suscripción mensual, tenía que cancelar al menos un día antes de la fecha en la que terminaba la prueba. La FTC dice que debido a la conducta de NutraClick la gente perdió más de un millón de dólares.

¿Estás considerando ofrecimientos gratuitos? Ten presente lo siguiente:

  • Investiga un poco. Busca en internet ingresando el nombre del producto y la compañía con palabras tales como “review”, “complaint” o “scam” para leer las opiniones de otras personas. Si haces la búsqueda en español, agrega palabras como "comentario", "queja" o "estafa".
  • Busca los términos y condiciones del ofrecimiento. Si no puedes encontrarlos o no comprendes exactamente lo que estás aceptando y cuándo te cobrarán — incluyendo qué te cobrarán y en qué fecha tienes que actuar para evitar un cargo – no te inscribas.
  • Revisa los resúmenes de cuenta de tus tarjetas de crédito y débito. Si te cobran algo que no ordenaste, disputa esos cargos tan pronto como los detectes.
  • Lee los resúmenes de cuenta de tus tarjetas de crédito y débito. Así te enterarás de inmediato si te están efectuando cargos por algo que no pediste.

Y si una compañía no informa claramente cuándo te facturará después de tu prueba gratis, cuéntaselo a la FTC.

13 Comments

Guill21
September 22, 2020
Muchas compañías de Internet,te dan 15 días ,para cancelar para que pruebes el producto pero se demoran 10 o 12 días en llegar entonces te cobran antes de realmente saber que compraste,y son casi todas las compañías que venden medicamentos sin resetas, gracias
lm4100
September 22, 2020
This is why I never do anything that's a free trial. Even if you cancel before the end of your trial, it takes time to process you request & you can get billed for more than one subscription. Sometimes, you can even get customer service to cancel in the first place. Then you have to fight it & rarely ever get your money back. I learned many years ago.
TobydonDon't u…
September 22, 2020
I got sucked in by TFCO NUTRA MARKETING, WILMINGTON,DE I ordered a free trail and within 2 weeks of ordering a 30 day free trail they sent me more products and charged my credit card. I ended up losing the fight and being charged $70 for product I didn't want. If it's truly free trail why do they need a credit card? Not falling for it again.
Nanette#1
September 22, 2020
By the way, I did get stuck that way. And it was irritating that they could go into may account and just remove money after I said no and they said it was posted but the ad did not have it posted. And then the bank took it on she said she felt they were lying about everything while she spent a good hour on the phone with them. But there was notnothing that could be done according to the lawyer she called unless I sued a civil suit. They took a lot of money from my account and I could not stop it. I didnt have the money to sue them. But I left my thoughts everywhere I could. Yes read take and print out. if it says you must call do it the day you ordered. Take down names phone numbers and have witnesses to what you are doing..This ole lady learned the fast way
CnsmrPrtcnFrK
September 22, 2020
Very happy that you’ve nailed these scammers and that you keep alerting us about them albeit after the event. In my opinion, if consumers are well educated about food supplements in this case, and know that they are waste of money the less likely they will be tempted to fall for these scams. Consumers need to be well protected both from the deceiving terms and conditions and also from the fake products they’re exposed to. I wish the FDA could do more about their label disclaimer of ‘These statements ....... have not been evaluated by the FDA’. Thanks so much for your vigilance and for your prompt actions.
Honor
September 22, 2020
Having learned long ago, and painfully so in my wallet, I never submit to any 'free trial' offer. What looks good over the fence often isn't once you climb over.
Tired & Retired
September 22, 2020
These scams really aggravate me. I noticed several years ago that even though the business was offering a "free" sample or "free" trial offer, they ALWAYS want that credit card number. You don't need my credit card number for something that is supposed to be free of charge!
figmo6673
September 22, 2020
Using the Internet, there are hundreds, at least, of dishonest businesses and people. Often the rhetoric used to explain free trials and billing procedures is convoluted, confusing, misleading, and sometimes outright dishonest. Having the Federal Trade Commission look into "shady" operations saves the average citizen thousands of dollars, and I (for one) sincerely appreciate the information made available to consumers. Thank you for all you do, FTC!
Jan
September 22, 2020
This is a LONG time problem in the cosmetic industry. When the trial offer is over they automatically mail you another " month" of the product whether you want it or not.
SmartConsumer2020
September 22, 2020
I ordered a "risk free" sample of Arovanti Eye Sreum and Facial Cream. I was charged two separate shipping charges ($6.77 and $6.22) for an 11oz shipment that arrived in one back. The shipping should have been no more than $7.00, period. I called to request a refund and found that I was dealing with "MakeUp World" and the customer rep could bearly speak English. She refused to refund one of the shipping amounts stating that the USPS did the shipping! Blatant lie and fraud. Then she said she could cancel my "monthly" account! I never agreed to order any more let alone commit to a monthly shipment. This is a prime example of internet fraud and the company needs to be held accountable. Daytime talk show host, Kelly Rippa is supposed to the the manufacturer of the cream.
Don't Roberta#
September 22, 2020
Crepe Erase trial isn’t free. They charge and then have your credit card for their auto shipments. I’ve been caught up in this before
Don't use your…
September 23, 2020
I DON'T THINK THAT PEOPLE SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO CHARGE YOUR ACCOUNT WITH OUT FIRST NITIFYYING YOU THAT YOR TRIAL PERIOD HAS ENDED AND THAT THE WILL BE CHARGING YOU X AMOUNT ON ON X DATE. I'M 81 YEARS OLD AND CAN'T REMEMBER ALL THESE THINGS. I WRITE THE INFO DOWN BUT THEN CAN'T FIND WHERE I WROTE IT
DONNAI1022
October 20, 2020
Audible.com just build my account twice in one day for a trial that I ended five days before the trial ended. I’m about to dispute the charges through my bank! I sent them a letter to stop billing my account audible should be ashamed of yourselves!!!